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Blended Learning, EdTech, Edublogger, Education

Here is the Backside of #Gamification

Well into the the Quest to become Calculus Gods, its time to show how things are working behind the scenes…Most of this information can be found here: http://haselcalc.wikispaces.com/

Over the summer I tried really hard to come up with different things for the students to purchase.  Here is a list of those items as they are right now:

Potion of Healing Allows you to revise up to 10% of a test and must be used immediately on finding out the test score. You may not use anything not available for the test during healing. 10
Potion of Wisdom Allows you to ask the teacher one question during a test. The more specific the question, the more specific the answer. 15
Genie Lamp When used the teacher will grant 10 wishes (in the form of questions) about a current topic. This is different than solving 10 problems. This will have an effect on the whole class. 15
Potion of Power Allows you to meet with up to two other students, who also have this potion, during a test for five minutes. You may not have your tests with you when using this potion. 8
Staff of Completion This will allow you to get full credit for a homework assignment. 5
Potion of Clairvoyance When used, the teacher will remove two answer choices from one multiple choice question on a test. 10
Sword of Omnipotence Get the complete answer from the teacher on your test, sword has an effect once per semester. 20
Spell of Divine Intervention You may use this spell to work on your test with up to 2 other people. Each person in your party must use Divine Intervention. You can only use the materials that are available for the test. 30
The T.A.R.D.I.S. Use the T.A.R.D.I.S. to travel in the space-time continuum and re-take a test from earlier in the semester. You cannot time travel to the semester final. This is discovered after successfully completing 4 quests.

I have asked the students to give me their ideas as they think of cool stuff they would want to buy.  There have been a couple of good ideas – they need to be fleshed out a bit before being added – but they are on the burner.  I am trying to make a market where the students can buy things they would want and also have a cost that is fair depending on the item.

Students have some choices on how to earn credits to use to buy the above listed items:

Parent Involvement 1
Help Provide Classroom Supplies 1
Homework 1
Teach Class a Problem 1
Write a weekly blog about class 1
Project/Presentation 2
Participate in Back Channel each day for one week 2
Research 3
Post teaching on YouTube and share link 3
Host/Participate in a Hangout 3

I am having a little bit of difficulty getting the students to step off into the list on their own.  When I have set up class time to accomplish some of these items – they dig in!  But when they are in that space waiting for a Boss Fight or a Checkpoint and could be doing this, they do not see it yet.  That comes back on me – so my efforts need to increase in this space.  Once the kids have finished one of these items they fill out a Google Form:

http://goo.gl/ZC5cr6

Get Yer Credits

After filling out this information for me, there is a Google Sheet that gets populated and with the help of a good friend who is a spreadsheet whiz, I was able to set up a place to sort out all of this info:  Master Credit Tracking Sheet.  It only takes a few short minutes each week to update the information and share with students.  As you look through the tracking sheet – hover on the top lines to see the formulas that I am using.  Feel free to borrow or suggest an improvement!  The best thing is the Pivot Table choice which sorts all of this information into an easily readable form:

Pivot Table

The last thing to do is add a formula to track when students spend credits.  Since there have not been very many purchases yet (only one) I have not sorted this out yet – but it should be as simple as adding a formula on the student total sheet.  This is a separate sheet where I copy and past the pivot table.  It shows the students only what they need to see – they don’t need to see all of the magic on my master sheet.

Finally as they move through a couple of checkpoints and quest boss fights, the students will earn badges and points.  The points are different from the credits – points will allow students to level up and choose the way they want to learn.  I use Edmodo for the badge creating/tracking, it already has a built in package for this and my students are already there.  The points and badges can be used to choose from the three different paths:

  1. Newbie Calc Student
  2. Calc Recon – Requires 8 skill points and 6 badges. Able to recon different learning strategies by creating one video lesson this will count as completing the assignment for that section.
  3. Calc Spy – Requires 8 skill points and 13 badges, and Recon for one level. Able to spy the teacher and direct own learning (readings, special task, watching videos and practice problems optional). Must continue to master at 80%.
  4. Calculus Master – Requires 12 skill points and 10 Badges and {Recon, Doodler, or Genie} for two levels or {Spy, Fixer, or Guiding Spirit} for one level. The Calculus Master directs own learning and may develop alternative ways to demonstrate mastery of learning objectives. No longer needs to take quizzes. Must maintain 80% mastery.
  1. Newbie Calc Student
  2. Calc Doodler – Requires 8 skill points and 6 badges. Able to doodle for different learning strategies by using the SMARTboard weekly to demonstrate knowledge of a section. This will count as completing that section of homework.
  3. Calc Fixer – Requires 8 skill points and 13 badges, and Doodler for one level. Able to fix their own learning (readings, special task, watching videos and practice problems optional). Must continue to master at 80%.
  4. Calculus Master – Requires 12 skill points and 10 Badges and {Recon, Doodler, or Genie} for two levels or {Spy, Fixer, or Guiding Spirit} for one level. The Calculus Master directs own learning and may develop alternative ways to demonstrate mastery of learning objectives. No longer needs to take quizzes. Must maintain 80% mastery.
  1. Newbie Calc Student
  2. Calc Genie – Requires 8 skill points and 6 badges. Able to answer questions (coach) others ask in mastering concepts and skills. Must document coaching with assignment tasks. This will count as completing the assignment for that section.
  3. Calc Guiding Spirit – Requires 8 skill points and 13 badges, and Genie for one level. Able to guide their own learning (readings, special task, watching videos and practice problems optional). Must continue to master at 80%.
  4. Calculus Master – Requires 12 skill points and 10 Badges and {Recon, Doodler, or Genie} for two levels or {Spy, Fixer, or Guiding Spirit} for one level. The Calculus Master directs own learning and may develop alternative ways to demonstrate mastery of learning objectives. No longer needs to take quizzes. Must maintain 80% mastery.

These items I will be able to keep up with in the gradebook, so no forms or fancy spreadsheets are necessary.  These have been organized for students to level up after they have successfully completed two quests.  I haven’t talked with the students about this part yet – they haven’t reached it.  But the time is coming to allow them the opportunity to start learning in a way that best works for them…

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About Scott

My name is Scott. After 18.5 years as a high school math teacher in public education I have made the move to become a full time PhD student. This decisions was difficult, but has been one of the most rewarding things that I have ever done. Teaching in high school was an incredible experience for me, so leaving an environment that I loved for the unknown was a challenge. As I high school teacher, I taught almost every math course that could be offered. I was able to earn National Board Certification in Young Adult Math. I was honored as my building Teacher of the Year, no mean feat at Edmond Memorial High School!! My career changed as I became fascinated with educational technology and all of the things that it can do for teachers. I flipped my class. I used iPads and blogging (in high school math!!). I started using gamification and mastery learning. I changed my practice. I chose to go back to school to learn as much as I could. To bring that knowledge from academia and research to the teacher on the front line. I have had the opportunity to present at several conferences and share what I have learned with others. Its through these connections that we can be the best teachers we can for our students. They deserve it and we sell ourselves short when we don't give it. I love talking with teachers about change. About incorporating educational technology. About the power that they have to change lives. My blog space is me, it shares my passions and frustrations, my joys and my learnings. If you are interested in what I am studying, please visit my graduate school pages. If you are interested in the flipped classroom, I have some links to get your started. I would love to meet you! Do not hesitate to reach out! I would enjoy the opportunity to work with your staff or trade ideas with your teachers - let me know! Have a great day! #BeBrilliant

Discussion

2 thoughts on “Here is the Backside of #Gamification

  1. Scott, I observed your presentation at Encyclomedia 2016 on gamification. Previous to this, I was part of a workshop on gamification at the Model Schools Conference in Orlando, which is a pretty large conference. Your presentation was 10x more informative and captivating than the previous presentation. I immediately took the information you provided and went back to my ELA department to talk about engaging our students through gamification. We’re using it to develop a reading program to hopefully eliminate the dreaded “reading fatigue” that seems to especially afflict our middle school students.

    Liked by 1 person

    Posted by Lindsay | October 27, 2016, 9:23 pm
    • So glad you got some great ideas! Don’t hesitate to ask questions along the way, I would love know how your reading program turns out! Head over to teachingfromhere.com for more posts and Gamification ideas 🙂

      Like

      Posted by Scott | October 28, 2016, 6:44 am

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